Apr. 6: Becoming an Organizer: Narrative, Identity and Social Action

  • 509 Knox Hall 606 West 122nd Street New York, NY, 10027 United States
(c) 2016 by Flynn Larsen. Photo courtesy of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

(c) 2016 by Flynn Larsen. Photo courtesy of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

WHEN: Thursday, April 6, 2017, 6 - 8 PM

WHERE: Knox Hall, 606 W. 122nd Street, Room 509

Formed at the disciplinary seams of the social sciences, the life history method is uniquely suited to observe and elucidate processes of becoming and being. The collection of life stories provides a tool to understand the ways that individuals come to see themselves at the intersection of multiple ways of being (LGBT, old, young, black, white)—articulating complex and dynamic selves.

Drawing from a multi-method longitudinal study of community-based organizers working across a range of movement communities in New York City, this talk asks: What are the processes that link a social movement actor’s identity or identities to issue orientations and action? Using the experiences of African-American LGBT and queer-identified community organizers, this talk will explore the use of both life history and network methods to identify and illuminate discursive articulations of identity that indicate more dynamic forms of protest and expansive claim-making beyond unidimensional issue framing.

Terrell Frazier is a Ph.D. student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. Before joining the Sociology department, Terrell completed his M.A. in African-American Studies at Columbia, where he also worked as the Director of Education and Outreach for the Columbia Center for Oral History Research and as a researcher at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics. 

While at the Center for Oral History Research, he launched the Telling Lives: Oral History for Social Change workshop series and co-edited Documenting and Interpreting Conflict Through Oral History. His current research explores—using both narrative and network methods—the relationship between social movement actors’ social positions and their capacities for strategic action.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Amy Starecheski at aas39@columbia.edu.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED.

NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED, BUT RSVPS ON THE EVENT FACEBOOK PAGE ARE APPRECIATED TO GAUGE ATTENDANCE.