CANCELLED: Mar. 9 | Indigenous Oral Histories, Blurring Boundaries in Academia

  • 509 Knox Hall 606 West 122nd Street New York, NY, 10027 United States

**REGRETTABLY, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED. PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF OUR OHMA WORKSHOP SERIES ON THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 2017**

The nature, form, scope and content of Indigenous oral histories make them seldom amenable to compartmentalization in academic knowledge categories. Likewise, many of the social science methods for evaluating Indigenous oral history sources are problematic.

The transdisciplinary nature of Indigenous Studies (Native American Studies) creates a space in the academy for Indigenous research methodologies and Indigenous knowledge. This workshop will examine the unique qualities of Indigenous oral histories and review some of the best practices on how to treat them with integrity within their own contexts.

Winona Wheeler is a member of the Ochekwi Sipi (Fisher River) Cree Nation in Treaty No. 5 (Manitoba) territory though her family hails from George Gordon’s First Nation in Treaty No. 4 territory (Saskatchewan). She has been a professional historian and a professor of Indigenous Studies since 1988 with research interests in and publications on the history of Indigenous-Newcomer relations, Indigenous oral histories and traditional knowledge, Indigenous & community-based research methodologies, colonialism and anti-colonial studies, Land Claims and Treaty Rights.

She is currently an Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Saskatchewan and a member of Aboriginal Advisory Committee of the Canadian Museum of History. Her past offices include President Elect of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) and Keeper for the Walking With Our Sisters Exhibit (October 31 – November 21, 2014 in Saskatoon).

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Amy Starecheski at aas39@columbia.edu.